Los Angeles Times

Two Senate Democrats want to know what role Kathy Kraninger, who is President Trump’s choice to lead the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, played in the administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy as a White House aide.
Time is running out on Mick Mulvaney's tenure as acting head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, but there's an easy way for the White House to extend his tenure: nominate somebody — anybody — else to permanently fill the job.
The White House Office of Management and Budget recently declared its support for legislation called the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act. The bill has been passed by the Senate and is expected to be approved by the House in coming weeks.
Rep. Jeb Hensarling welcomed the new director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a fellow Republican, to a hearing this month in the same way he did the former Democratic holder of the job — by accusing him of wielding near-dictatorial authority.
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is considering fining Wells Fargo & Co. hundreds of millions of dollars for its mortgage-lending and auto-insurance abuses — following up on a threat by President Trump to take aggressive action against the bank.
Mick Mulvaney, President Trump's appointee to oversee the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, has given big pay raises to the deputies he has hired to help him run the agency, according to salary records.
Unlike most people, Seal Beach resident Tom Hazelleaf took the time to read the contract when he recently received a new MasterCard.
Equifax Inc. was publicly excoriated by senators last fall for its massive data breach. Now, the company and other credit reporting firms are in line to get some last-minute benefits in a banking deregulation bill that originally was designed to punish them by adding new consumer rights.
White House budget chief Mick Mulvaney once likened government regulations to a "slow cancer," an attitude he shares with many of President Trump's appointees as well as the man himself. 
A former Wells Fargo mortgage banker in Beverly Hills who was fired and later fined by federal regulators has sued the bank, saying he was used as a scapegoat and that regulators ignored his attempts to report bad practices.