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FHFA Reaches $3.15 Billion MBS Settlement With Goldman Sachs

Aug 23, 2014

The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), as conservator of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, has announced it has reached a settlement with Goldman Sachs, related companies and certain named individuals. The settlement addresses claims alleging violations of federal and state securities laws in connection with private-label mortgage-backed securities (PLS) purchased by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac between 2005 and 2007. Under the terms of the settlement, Goldman Sachs will pay $3.15 billion in connection with releases and the purchase of securities that were the subject of statutory claims in the lawsuit FHFA v. Goldman Sachs & Co., et al., in the U.S. District Court of the Southern District of New York.  Goldman Sachs will pay approximately $2.15 billion to Freddie Mac and approximately $1 billion to Fannie Mae.  This settlement, worth approximately $1.2 billion, effectively makes Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac whole on their investments in the securities at issue. As part of the settlement, FHFA, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will release certain claims against Goldman Sachs & Co. related to the securities involved.  The settlement also resolves claims that involved a Goldman Sachs security in FHFA v. Ally Financial Inc., et al.  FHFA previously settled claims against Ally Financial Inc. This is the 16th settlement reached in the 18 PLS lawsuits​ FHFA filed in 2011. Three cases remain outstanding and FHFA is committed to satisfactory resolution of those actions.
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Aug 23, 2014
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