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Michigan industry appointments update - 11/13/2006

National Mortgage Professional
Nov 13, 2006

How to get an easy hard equity loanGary Opper, CPA, CFPhard equity loans Hard equity loans aren't as hard as some mortgage brokers think. They are easy. Some mortgage brokers are afraid to do them because they think the loans are different and difficult. They think these loans are tough or that the client would not accept the high interest rate of a hard equity loan. Hard equity loans are quite easy. Lenders do most or all of the processing. Your mortgage company never has to buy back a loan because all of the verifications are done independently by the mortgage lender. There is very little processing; no verification of a mortgage, income, assets or debts; no calculation of the debt ratio and no credit scoring. The credit report is generally not even reviewed by the lender. These loans are for clients who have: - No "stuff" to qualify; - No time; - No credit; - No income; - No assets; - No job; - Low or no credit scores; or - High or no debt ratios What you will need to get a loan There is very little needed in order to close a hard equity loan. The only thing a lender really looks at is one fraction. The numerator is how much the borrower wants, and the denominator is how much the property is worth. If that fraction is 65 percent or less, the loan will generally be granted. Everything else is superfluous; that is, the lender does not care about the borrower's story. The letters that try to explain credit issues are unnecessary. The lender doesn't care why your client is in bankruptcy or foreclosure. Since the lender places so much emphasis on the property, generally, the lender will control the property valuation procedures. The lender will either personally inspect the property or will have an appraiser inspect the property instead. Usually, the mortgage lender will order the real estate appraisal. Of course, you will have to do all of the federal and state disclosures that are required. These disclosures include a proper and accurate good faith estimate, a broker agreement and a Truth in Lending statement. If this is a Home Ownership and Equity Protection Act loan, all of the proper Section 32 disclosures may be required. A payoff statement will be required if the first mortgage is being paid off. A verification of the first mortgage will be required if this is a new second mortgage. Additionally, hazard, flood and windstorm insurance will be required. The lender will also require some type of application - perhaps a Form 1003 (Uniform Residential Loan Application). The application will be skeletal, requiring the name, home address and home phone number of the borrower. Also needed will be the borrower's Social Security number, work phone number and emergency contact phone number. A title policy will be required. The title policy is generally ordered through the lender's attorney or title company. Generally, the lender has a relationship with a closing agent who is familiar with the procedures of closing a hard equity loan fast. Using a lender's closing agent will expedite the closing, since the closing agent will be familiar with the hard equity lender's procedures and policies. Time is of the essence Hard equity lenders close loans in one to three days. If all the documents are available, the loan can close very quickly. Using the lender's vendors, appraiser and closing agent will expedite the closing. Hard equity loans are quick and easy. They are available for clients who have sufficient equity in their properties. If you have a loan that needs to close quickly or that you are having trouble gathering documentation for, suggest a hard equity loan to your borrower as a quick solution to his problem. Gary Opper, CPA, CFP is the president of Approved Financial Corporation and is past president of the Florida Association of Mortgage Brokers Miami Chapter. He may be reached at (954) 384-4557 or e-mail approv01@aol.com.
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