Skip to main content

Countrywide Continues Torrid Pace

National Mortgage Professional
Nov 15, 2002

Defending Your Computer, Part IIITom Estesvirus, backup, internet utilities Since my last article, in the June 2002 edition of The Mortgage Press, entitled, "Surviving the Computer Security War," my computer has been attacked 13 times! Fortunately, I had taken the time and effort to secure my system, or it could have been irreparably damaged. Computer security entails refusing the entrance of any uninvited person or program which might be trying to control or damage your personal computer or network. It should be as much of a priority as locking the doors to your home or office. In the past two installments of this three-part series, it has been established that, if you surf the Internet, utilize e-mail or transmit any data electronically, you will eventually be the victim of some security event, whether it be minor or catastrophic. The degree of devastation is controlled by you, because it is directly proportionate to how prepared you are. In my previous article, I focused on four ways in which you can defend your system from assault, including: ++Obtaining, utilizing and updating anti-virus software; ++Deploying a firewall; ++Downloading patches for your programs; and ++Downloading and deploying program service packs. In addition to these tips, there are three additional strategies which will help to avoid and survive attacks on your system. 1. Craft and deploy rules for office e-mail, since that is how most viruses are transmitted. You can distribute them just like you would an employee handbook. To help get you started, let me make the following suggestions: ++Make sure your program is set to scan incoming e-mail for viruses. This may sound obvious, but not every program is automatically configured for this. ++Be cautious about opening e-mail from someone you do not know, and if you do not recognize a particular piece of e-mail, then delete it! If you are using Microsoft Outlook or Exchange, then you can set an auto-respond feature which will send people a copy of your policiy. ++Even if you know the sender, pay attention to the e-mail's subject line; if it seems out of character with that person, then delete it. For example, if you receive an e-mail from your pastor that says, "Check out these party pictures!" you can pretty much assume you should delete it. Call the sender and clarify, though, you can always ask them to resend it. ++Never, under any circumstances, open executable attachments, which contain the extension, "exe," because that is how most viruses are transmitted. 2. Develop a relationship with a computer expert before you need their services. Nobody waits until they are sick to find a good physician, so why would you wait for a major security breach before seeking out a service expert? You can search the phone book or ask your local computer store for a recommendation. The most important thing is to conduct an interview with any potential candidates. Take an application, and then get the names and numbers of at least three for references. Inquire about the service person's response time and commitment to the project, and impress upon them that you are looking for a long-term relationship with someone who can help keep your system operational and respond quickly when needed. Seek out their advice on what you need to do in order to recover from a major security event. Besides, if you wait until you need an expert to call one, it will probably require more of your money and time, so stay ahead of the curve. 3. The final and most important piece of advice is to back up your data. Even the most knowledgeable professionals get hacked (ask your new IT expert). Using the tips above will help you avoid most viruses, but you need to come to terms with the fact that no program is foolproof. So, the final and most important tip is to backup all of your files. Even experts get hacked and are susceptible to viruses, but you can lessen your chances by taking these precautions. You need to operate as though you know you are inevitably going to get a virus or experience a security violation. If you knew that your house was going to be robbed, wouldn't you get insurance? That is what backups are all about--having insurance for your data. With the price of CD writers falling, there is no excuse not to get one. CD-Rs are as cheap as floppy disks and hold more than 500 percent more data. Backing up your files is the single most important thing you can do to prevent a virus from wreaking havoc on your company. You can backup your entire system or just your data. If you have kept the reinstall disks for your application programs, it is not as critical to back those up, however, you do need to back up your databases, documents, spreadsheets, customized templates, cookies and e-mail address books. That is your work, so make sure you protect it. You are the only one who knows how often to back up your records. Ask yourself how much information you can afford to loose, and gauge the back-up frequency accordingly. The business world is full of potential hazards, but good professionals know how to lessen their exposure to risks. The personal computer has become a very important part of business, but in the worst of cases, the computer is a hazardous open door through which the world can gain access to your important and confidential business files. A secured system is what the personal computer is designed to be--a tool to make your business better and more efficient. So, do your part to ensure that it stays that way. Tom Estes is Technology and Publications Chair of the North Carolina Association of Mortgage Professionals and regional manager of American Residential Mortgage. He may be reached by phone at (877) 327-9684, fax at (888) 445-0393 or e-mail greatsouth@carolina.rr.com.
Fifth Third Bank Expands Down Payment Assistance Program

The program will provide up to $3,600 towards a down payment for families with low to moderate income.

Industry News
Jun 09, 2021
Filo Mortgage Launches Low-Rate Guarantee

National mortgage lender Filo Mortgage is offering to beat competitors' pricing by $1,000 with its Low-Rate Guarantee.

Industry News
Jun 08, 2021
FAU Index Shows Where Consumers Should Buy Or Rent

Consumers are better off renting in cities like Dallas, Texas

Industry News
Jun 07, 2021
Verus Title Inc. Expands Into Dallas-Fort Worth Texas

Verus plans to take advantage of the Dallas-Fort Worth market before expanding throughout the state.

Community
Jun 07, 2021
Freddie Mac Multifamily Extends Forbearance Deadline To September

Freddie Mac Multifamily extended the deadline for requesting a new COVID-19 forbearance agreement for its Multifamily loans to September 30, 2021.

Industry News
Jun 04, 2021
Fannie Mae Launches 'Your Own Story' To Educate Future Homebuyers

Fannie Mae is seeking to help demystify the homebuying process for future homeowners with “Your Own Story.” A new campaign to educate future homebuyers on the entire process.

Industry News
Jun 04, 2021