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Colorado AG indicts three in Denver-area mortgage fraud case

Feb 24, 2010

Colorado Attorney General John Suthers announced that the Statewide Grand Jury has indicted Marcus Williams, Kimberly Anderson and Scott Peters on suspicion of running an elaborate mortgage fraud scheme under the auspices of Blackhawk Property Management. According to the 23-count indictment, Williams, Anderson and Peters diverted money from home sellers or funding companies to Blackhawk Property Management, which functioned as a shell company. During the deals, the suspects allegedly falsified loan applications to deceive lenders; used false inspections to divert money into the company’s coffers; and, manipulated closing documents to skim money off real estate purchases. “Since becoming attorney general, my office has made investigating and prosecuting mortgage fraud cases one of our top priorities,” Suthers said. “Mortgage fraud harms everyone involved in real estate transactions—lenders, buyers and sellers—by disrupting the home loan market, making credit less available and stealing from Coloradans looking to sell their homes. This indictment confirms that law enforcement will vigorously pursue mortgage fraud cases.” According to the indictment, Williams, Anderson and Peters’ criminal enterprise engaged in mortgage fraud from April 2006 through September 2008. Each defendant faces at least three felony charges. Williams is suspected of violating the Colorado Organized Crime Control Act, a class-two felony. The Office of the Attorney General will prosecute Williams, Anderson and Peters in Denver County District Court.  For more information, visit www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov.
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Feb 24, 2010
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