Skip to main content

Consumer Direct Title Insurance: A Wake Up Call for Title Agents?

Andrew Liput Esq.
Aug 19, 2014

A few columns ago, I discussed how the initial negative reaction to vendor management and independent vetting of title agents was short-sighted. That vetting established a form of new credential that agents could use to set themselves apart from the pack. At that time, I commented about how the major underwriters seemed to be growing their direct-managed offices, perhaps to reduce their reliance on contract agents to increase revenue and reduce risk. Vetting, I suggested, helped to level the playing field for small agents by allowing them to market themselves to banks and mortgage lenders as subject to an independent review and oversight from a risk standpoint (separate from the underwriters with whom they have contracts and revenue sharing arrangements). I ended that column saying: “Vetting helps the little guy!” Now, we have word that direct-to-consumer title insurance is developing: Title insurers bypassing agents and selling insurance direct to consumers at a 35 percent average premium discount. This will result in fewer agents and lower commissions as everyone tries to stay competitive. And while it may offer consumers better pricing, there is no guarantee it will offer them betters services, nor does it eliminate vetting and monitoring since lenders will still be held accountable for settlement agent activities. It may, however, leave many small agents looking for a new way to earn a living. Competition can be good, as it breeds innovation, lowers prices and generally leads to better service. Consolidation can be bad, especially if it creates an environment that is volume-driven and revenue-focused, and is not consumer-friendly. Time will tell what consumer-direct title insurance will mean for consumers and the industry. In the meantime, small agents may be able to demonstrate to banks and lenders that they are just as good a risk as large firms in the provision of mortgage settlement services. It’s time to embrace independent vetting; it may just be the advantage you will need to stay competitive in this new era pushing greater consumer choice with respect to title services. Andrew Liput is president and CEO of Secure Settlements Inc., a company he founded after nearly 10 years studying the problem of escrow and closing fraud and the uninsured risks associated with mortgage closing professionals. He may be reached by e-mail at [email protected] This article originally appeared in the April 2014 issue of National Mortgage Professional Magazine. 
Published
Aug 19, 2014
'A Long Road To Normal'

Nominated again to lead The Fed, Powell tells Senate committee to expect three rate hikes, but 'if we have to raise interest rates more over time, we will.'

Regulation and Compliance
Jan 11, 2022
CFPB: Complaint Response Worsens At Big 3 Credit Bureaus

Report claims Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion routinely failed to fully respond to consumers with errors.

Regulation and Compliance
Jan 10, 2022
The Fed Names Chairs, Deputy Chairs For 12 Reserve Banks

In recent years, the Federal Reserve System has worked to increase the overall diversity of the Reserve Bank and branch boards of directors and continues to build on those efforts.

Regulation and Compliance
Jan 06, 2022
The Fed: Rate Hike Likely Coming in June

Federal Open Market Committee's December minutes reveal discussion of first hike in federal funds rate in 2Q of 2022, as well as of ending asset purchases by March.

Regulation and Compliance
Jan 05, 2022
AARMR No Protection For Savanah Scares

Conference provides opportunity for regulators to interact, discuss common topics

Regulation and Compliance
Jan 04, 2022
McCargo Sworn In As Ginnie Mae President

Former HUD official becomes the first female to lead the Government National Mortgage Association.

Regulation and Compliance
Jan 04, 2022