Skip to main content

Native American Tribe Sues HUD Over Mortgagee Letter

Apr 23, 2019
The U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) has charged Plano, Texas landlords Quang Dangtran and his wife, Ha Nguyen, with violating the Fair Housing Act by refusing to lease a room to a prospective tenant because she is African-American

The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has been sued by a Native American tribe that claims a recently published Mortgagee Letter will deprive the tribe of an important revenue source.
 
Utah’s Cedar Band of Paiutes and two of its wholly-owned companies, the Cedar Band Corp. and the CBC Mortgage Agency (CBCMA), filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Utah seeking an immediate halt to HUD’s Mortgagee Letter 19-06, claiming that it will prohibit CBCMA from participating in home-purchasing assistance programs outside of its tribal sovereignty. CBCMA is a governmental housing agency that provides down payment assistance to borrowers planning to buy a mortgage insured by the Federal Housing Administration. The tribe claims the Mortgagee Letter was released without prior notice or comment input and was issued outside of the traditional process that requires presidential approval. The tribe added that the Mortgagee Letter encroaches on tribal sovereignty and goes against federal policy on Native American economic development.
 
“The harm that HUD has inflicted on CBCMA and the members of the Cedar Band with this administrative action is staggering,” said Lead Counsel Helgi C. Walker of Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP, who is representing the tribe. “CBCMA has operated as a governmental provider of down payment assistance for years, indeed pursuant to regulations that expressly allow tribes to provide down payment assistance. But now HUD has changed the rules without notice, throwing CBCMA and borrowers into a state of chaos. We intend to rectify this unlawful agency action and vindicate our client's legal rights.”

 
About the author
Published
Apr 23, 2019
In Wake Of NAR Settlement, Dual Licensing Carries RESPA, Steering Risks

With the NAR settlement pending approval, lenders hot to hire buyers' agents ought to closely consider all the risks.

A California CRA Law Undercuts Itself

Who pays when compliance costs increase? Borrowers.

CFPB Weighs Title Insurance Changes

The agency considers a proposal that would prevent home lenders from passing on title insurance costs to home buyers.

Fannie Mae Weeds Out "Prohibited or Subjective" Appraisal Language

The overall occurrence rate for these violations has gone down, Fannie Mae reports.

Arizona Bans NTRAPS, Following Other States

ALTA on a war path to ban the "predatory practice of filing unfair real estate fee agreements in property records."

Kentucky Legislature Passes Bill Banning NTRAPS

The new law prohibits the recording of NTRAPS in property records, creates penalties if NTRAPS are recorded, and provides for the removal of NTRAPS currently in place.